Integrative Science Symposia

 

Check back for updates on speakers and programming.

 

Who’s In, Who’s Out? Loneliness, Exclusion, and Integration
Friday 24 March
8:30 – 10:50 (8:30 AM – 10:50 AM)

Loneliness may be a fundamental part of the human condition, but scientists have only recently begun exploring its causes and consequences. A panel of researchers representing the fields of psychology, medicine, and anthropology will share data from diverse nations and cultures on the psychological effects of loneliness, exclusion, and integration. The discussion will explore these implications from biological, economic, social, and ecological perspectives.

Chair: Silvia H. Koller, Department of Psychology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Taciano L. Milfont, School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Frosso Motti-Stefanidi, Department of Psychology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

Stacey Sinclair, Department of Psychology, Princeton University, USA

Alan Teo, Department of Psychiatry and School of Public Health, Oregon Health & Science University, USA

 
The Science of Successful Aging
Friday 24 March
8:30 – 10:50 (8:30 AM – 10:50 AM)

Given the rapidly aging populations of both Eastern and Western societies, it is crucial to understand how to promote and preserve important social and cognitive functions so that older adults can lead independent, self-fulfilling lives. From examining links between changing brain structure and cognitive function to exploring the role of social relationships in the lives of older adults, this symposium addresses different levels of investigation and diverse research methods aimed at supporting successful aging.

Chair: Corinna E. Loeckenhoff, Department of Human Development, Cornell University, USA

Monica Fabiani, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Teresa Liu-Ambrose, Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Canada

Denise C. Park, Center for Vital Longevity, The University of Texas at Dallas, USA

Karl A. Pillemer, Department of Human Development, Cornell University, USA

 
Bridging the Lab and the Real World
Friday 24 March
14:00 – 16:20 (2:00 PM – 4:20 PM)

Researchers have long debated the extent to which discoveries from controlled experiments can be generalized into the field. This symposium brings together researchers whose work bridges the divide between tightly controlled experimental paradigms and the study of behavior and brain function in the real world. The speakers will discuss the theoretical and methodological implications of research on spatial cognition in virtual environments; the use of eye tracking in real life contexts to understand the relationship between human gaze and locomotion; the examination of gesture as a core component of everyday language use; and attentional processes in complex natural environments.

Chair: Gabriella Vigliocco, Institute of Multimodal Communication, University College London, United Kingdom

Karen E. Adolph, Department of Psychology, New York University, USA

Emiliano Macaluso, Impact Team, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, France

Susan Goldin-Meadow, Department of Comparative Human Development, The University of Chicago, USA

Yvonne Rogers, Department of Computer Science, University College London, United Kingdom

Rick Dale, Department of Cognition & Information Sciences, University of California, Merced, USA

 
Our Social Brain: Neurobiology of Human Interactions
Friday 24 March
14:00 – 16:20 (2:00 PM – 4:20 PM)

What makes the human mind special? Where do human identities, values, preferences, and emotion come from? What capacities underlie moral reasoning, empathy, and altruism as well as the darker sides of human nature? This symposium show how researchers using neuroscientific approaches contribute insights and answers to these fundamental questions about the nature of our minds and human sociality.

Chair: Piotr Winkielman, Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, USA

Christian Keysers, Social Brain Lab, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, and Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Brian D. Knutson, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Stanford University, USA

Claus Lamm, Faculty of Psychology, Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods University of Vienna, Austria

Rebecca Saxe, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Ying-yi Hong, Department of Marketing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Discussant)

 
In Sync: The Dynamics of Social Coordination
Saturday 25 March
8:30 – 10:50 (8:30 AM – 10:50 AM)

Social interactions dominate human lives, so we need to understand the underlying mechanisms that allow individuals to coordinate their behavior, using affective, social, linguistic, and situational cues. From computational cognitive science, affective neuroscience, to philosophy this symposium will cover the diverse methodological and theoretical approaches that are driving innovation in our understanding of coordination on multiple levels.

Chair: Daniel Richardson, Experimental Psychology, University College London, United Kingdom

Nick Chater, Behavioural Science Group, Warwick Business School, United Kingdom

Natalie Sebanz, Department of Cognitive Science, Central European University, Hungary

Andrzej Nowak, Department of Psychology, University of Warsaw, Poland and Florida Atlantic University, USA

Antonia Hamilton, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, United Kingdom

Shaun Gallagher, Department of Philosophy, University of Memphis, USA

Marco Iacoboni, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California,
Los Angeles, USA

*Note, due to personal circumstances, Marco Iacoboni will not be able to present at ICPS.

 
Better Minds: Understanding Cognitive Enhancement
Saturday 25 March
8:30 – 10:50 (8:30 AM – 10:50 AM)

Strains in social welfare systems across the world have fueled a strong research interest in cognitive enhancement. Interventions to improve mental functions could, for example, help individuals obtain good jobs and avoid the need for unemployment assistance. This symposium pursues a mechanistically oriented, theory-driven approach that tries to understand and explain how, at different levels and using diverse approaches, music, exercise, cognitive training, and meditation enhance a wide range of cognitive processes.

Chair: Lorenza S. Colzato, Department of Psychology, Cognitive Psychology Unit, Leiden University, The Netherlands

Daphné Bavelier, Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Arthur F. Kramer, Department of Psychology, Northeastern University, USA

E. Glenn Schellenberg, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Canada

Ilina Singh, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

 
Emotions in Context
Saturday 25 March
14:00 – 16:20 (2:00 PM – 4:20 PM)

Our emotions endow our lives with nuance and depth, turning external events into personal experiences that are sorrowful or jubilant, terrifying or awe-inspiring. Although it may sometimes seem that our emotional styles are set in stone, research has revealed that the underlying brain circuitry is remarkably malleable and can be shaped over time. This interdisciplinary symposium will explore the contexts in which emotions are functional and helpful, and those in which they are dysfunctional or even pathological.

Chair: Tanja Michael, Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Universität des Saarlandes, Germany

Ralph Adolphs, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology, USA

Iris M. Engelhard*, Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Klaus R. Scherer, Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Jeanne L. Tsai, Department of Psychology, Stanford University, USA

Frank H. Wilhelm, Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Salzburg, Austria

Klaus R. Scherer, Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Switzerland (Discussant)

*Note, due to personal circumstances, Iris M. Engelhard will not be able to present at ICPS.

 
The Push and Pull of Values and Behavior
Saturday 25 March
14:00 – 16:20 (2:00 PM – 4:20 PM)

How do values guide our behavior? And how does behavior, in turn, inform our values? A unique group of leading researchers will discuss the dynamic link between values and behavior from the individual to societal levels. Integrating diverse perspectives and topics, this symposium will examine the relationship between values and behavior as manifested in multiculturalism and situated cognition; parents’ cultural beliefs and childrearing practices; theories about the self and behavioral regulation; and religious, political, and cultural conflict and resolution.

Chair: Qi Wang, Department of Human Development, Cornell University, USA

Chi-yue Chiu, Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

Heidi Keller, Institute for Migration Research and Intercultural Studies, Osnabrück University, Germany

Hazel R. Markus, Department of Psychology, Stanford University, USA

Scott Atran, School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Walter Mischel, Department of Psychology, Columbia University, USA (Discussant)